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اطلاعیه شماره ۲ سازمان فضایی ایران در خصوص رصد مدارگرد تیانگونگ-۱

سازمان فضایی ایران از کلیه منجمان آماتور و رصدخانه‌های کشور دعوت می‌کند تا در صورت رصد گذرهای مدارگرد Tiangong-1 داده‌ها و تصاویر ثبت‌شدهٔ خود را به ایمیل رسمی isao@isa.ir ارسال کنند.
از رصدگرانی که تا پیش از ساعت ۱۲ ظهر روز ۱۳ فروردین داده‌های خود را ارسال کنند به رسم یادبود تقدیر به عمل خواهد آمد.

 همچنین علاقه‌مندان می‌توانند از طریق پارامترهای مداری (TLE) زیر و با استفاده از نرم‌افزارهای نجومی (مانند Starry Night) مسیر حرکت و پیش‌بینی دقیق گذرها بر اساس موقعیت جغرافیایی خود را شبیه‌سازی کنند.

TIANGONG 1

1 37820U 11053A 18091.00304286 .02715064 91996-5 19001-3 0 9990

2 37820 42.7428 200.6065 0007470 347.8126 12.9725 16.40004788373879


Tiangong-1 (Chinese: 天宫一号; pinyin: Tiāngōng yīhào; literally: "Celestial Palace 1") was China's first prototype space station,—orbiting Earth September 2011–April 2018—serving as both a manned laboratory and an experimental testbed to demonstrate orbital rendezvous and docking capabilities during its two years of active operational life.<. Launched unmanned aboard a Long March 2F/G rocket on 29 September 2011, it was the first operational component of the Tiangong program, which aims to place a larger, modular station into orbit by 2023. Tiangong-1 was initially projected to be deorbited in 2013, to be replaced over the following decade by the larger Tiangong-2 and Tiangong-3 modules, but as of 31 March 2018 it was still aloft, though in a decaying orbit. It rentered Earth’s atmosphere early in the morning of 2 April 2018 in UTC.

 
Model of the Tiangong Space Lab and Shenzhou manned spacecraft.

Tiangong-1 was visited by a series of Shenzhou spacecraft during its two-year operational lifetime. The first of these, the unmanned Shenzhou 8, successfully docked with the module in November 2011, while the manned Shenzhou 9 mission docked in June 2012. A third and final mission to Tiangong-1, the manned Shenzhou 10, docked in June 2013. The manned missions to Tiangong-1 were notable for including China's first female astronauts, Liu Yang and Wang Yaping.

On 21 March 2016, after a lifespan extended by two years, the Space Engineering Office announced that Tiangong-1 had officially ended its service. They went on to state that the telemetry link with Tiangong-1 had been lost. A couple of months later, amateur satellite trackers watching Tiangong-1 found that China's space agency had lost control of the station. In September, after conceding they had lost control over the station, officials speculated that the station would re-enter and burn up in the atmosphere late in 2017.

According to Manned Space Engineering Office, as of 1 April 2018, Tiangong-1 was orbiting at an altitude of 104.1 miles (167.6 km), which corresponds to an orbital speed of 17,000 miles per hour (28,000 km/h). It is expected to deorbit between 1 April and 2 April 2018, although estimates vary and the precise re-entry is ultimately impossible to predict. The station will re-enter between 42.7°N and 42.7°S latitude, at an unknown longitude, although North America, Australia, Europe, northern South America, and southern Asia are excluded from recent forecasts.

According to Manned Space Engineering Office, as of 1 April 2018, Tiangong-1 was orbiting at an altitude of 104.1 miles (167.6 km), which corresponds to an orbital speed of 17,000 miles per hour (28,000 km/h) The station crashed into the South Pacific Ocean on 2 April 2018 at 00:15 UTC.

 

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